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24 Mar

We got this note from a grateful surgeon whose 14-year-old son suffered from night terrors at least two or three times a week.  It was hard on him and hard on the whole family.  The solution turned out to be a simple audio download – some guided imagery for sleep.  Check out her note:   

I am a surgeon who first became aware of the benefits of guided imagery when one of our anesthesiologists recommended your surgery guided imagery download to one of our pre-op patients.

23 Mar

Researchers from Baylor University and the University of Michigan examined the effect of hypnotic relaxation therapy on sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This was a secondary outcome from a larger randomized, controlled trial.

Sexual dysfunction was measured by the Sexual Activity Questionnaire (SAQ).

Significant improvement in sexual pleasure, and remediation of discomfort were reported after five weekly sessions of hypnotic relaxation therapy, as compared to those in the attention control group.

21 Mar

We got this excellent question from a practitioner who wonders if there’s research support for closing one’s eyes while listening to guided imagery. 

His sense is that people have more access to their unconscious and sub-conscious when their eyes are shut because when we shut down the frontal cortex, the imagistic mid-brain becomes more active. He asked what BR thought about this.

Check out his question and Belleruth’s answer:

20 Mar

Hello again.

I want to make sure you know about two brand new books, hot off the presses. 

Gestalt Coaching

First, for those of you in coaching and consulting, who are looking for greater self-mastery (and, really, people - who doesn’t want that?), check out Dorothy Siminovitch’s brand new book, A Gestalt Coaching Primer: The Path Toward Awareness IQ.

Dorothy, a successful and charismatic coach who is known for her ability to come up with creative solutions to remediate sticky issues, offers powerful ways to become more focused, agile, effective, and inspirational. She’s a dazzle.

17 Mar

We found this personal story about using guided imagery to help with withdrawal from prescribed medications, and it’s a wonderful example of the way guided imagery can have a positive impact, way beyond the original intention to clean up an inadvertent addiction. Check out what A. Baranowski had to say about this – it’s very encouraging.  

(Belleruth cracked a wide grin at the line she considers “highest praise” when this writer read some of the Q and A’s on our site and pronounced her “not a silly person”!!) 

Check it out:

16 Mar

Researchers from the University of Athens examined the effectiveness of an eight-week stress-management intervention program, which included progressive muscle relaxation, diaphragmatic breathing, guided imagery and cognitive restructuring, in overweight and obese children and adolescents.

Forty-nine children and adolescents (mean age ± SEM: 11.15 ± 1.48 years) were recruited to participate in this randomized controlled study. Of those, 23 participants were assigned into the intervention group, while 26 participants represented the control group. 

14 Mar

We got this excellent question from a fellow from Canada.  We’re really glad he asked, because it gives us a chance to spell out what we see as the main differences in quality and kind - and they’re pretty substantial.

Of course, our biggest concern about the freebies is that they might be a person’s first intro to guided imagery, and it could turn them off on the stuff that works. Read on, please.

13 Mar

I’m super excited to report that the California Community College system is initiating a cutting edge, pilot initiative to help its 2.1 million students in 113 colleges better manage stress, by giving its students free guided imagery downloads to support their emotional resilience, as they manage their very complicated, demanding lives. 

The web page, available through the Chancellor's Office and supported through the CCC Foundation, offers seven different guided imagery exercises for stress reduction, help with sleep, relief for the blues, help with concentration and overcoming procrastination. 

10 Mar

We got this feedback from an injury survivor with TBI (traumatic brain injury), after an accident she experienced three years ago. We were very grateful that she took the time to write this gracious, heartfelt note. 

Knowing as we do that TBI is often a frustrating, hard to manage condition, it’s very good to know that guided imagery really does provides some sufferers with relief.  Here is what she wrote:

09 Mar

Researchers from several German universities conducted a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy, acceptability and safety of guided imagery/hypnosis for fibromyalgia.   

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing GI/H with controls were analyzed. 

Primary outcomes showed gains in pain relief (≥ 50%), quality of life, psychological distress, disability, acceptability and safety at end of therapy and 3-month follow-up. 

07 Mar

We handed off this question about a 10-yr-old boy’s extreme separation anxiety to none other than nationally known child psychologist, Charlotte Reznick, PhD, a widely respected authority on such matters and author of the bestselling book, The Power of Your Child's Imagination. She teaches and lectures all over, writes for Psychology Today and Huffington Post, and creates guided imagery audios for children, some of which can be found in our catalog. 

In last week’s Ask Health Journeys, Dr. Charlotte answered his question and provided some really smart suggestions to this concerned father. As promised, this week Dr. Charlotte provides more tips on coping with separation anxiety. Read on!

06 Mar

How could we not love social workers? This is the profession that does so much for the underserved, those without voices or power, who fall through safety nets, have little or no access to goods, services, influence, job networks, transportation access or fresh food…

We’re everywhere, and therefore sometimes nearly invisible. We’re the psychotherapy providers who are trained to see the whole person, in the context of his or her family and community. We’re in hospitals, adoption agencies, child protective services, family service organizations, private practices, charitable and welfare organizations, HMO’s, EAP’s, corporate wellness centers, hospices, community organizations, legal services and community centers. We write legislation and change public policy. Sometimes, we even run for office.