Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys

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14 Oct

We got this note from a grateful veteran. It meant a lot to all of us. 

Dear Belleruth and Health Journeys,

Several years ago, I was deployed to Iraq with the Army. During this deployment, I witnessed and experienced many events and circumstances that still stay with me. You could say I’ve been haunted.

13 Oct

Researchers from the University of Buenos Aires examined responses to three different kinds of stress management programs for undergraduate students. Fifty-two students were randomly assigned to one of three stress management programs.

The first included deep breathing, the relaxation response, meditation, and guided imagery techniques (RRGI). The second program offered training in cognitive behavioral techniques (CB). The third program offered a combination of both RRGI and CB (RRGICB).

11 Oct

A depressed paramedic who has experienced multiple traumatic events, from an abusive mother in childhood through an abusive wife in adulthood, wonders what guided imagery he should listen to first.

We make some suggestions, but also suggest some counseling or joining a support group for releasing some repeating patterns with abusive relationships . Read on:

10 Oct

October is, among other things, ADHD Awareness Month – that’s Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder - something that a lot of kids and adults struggle with (not to mention the people who love them).

ADHD is marked by impulsivity, inattention, excitability, fidgeting, boredom, and (often but not always) learning and social difficulties. An otherwise sweet-natured, bright, loving child with loads of natural talent and a strong desire to succeed can get sandbagged by this condition, deceptively looking like a disruptive, unmotivated nuisance, in the classroom, on the playground or at home. 

07 Oct

A friend brought this Amazon review of our guided imagery for Cancer to our attention and it warmed the cockles of our hearts (wherever those are).

This audio was one of the first guided meditations we ever produced, and we’re delighted that it’s still doing some good.  It was recorded in 1990.  Here’s the review, as written, verbatim:

06 Oct

Researchers from the School of Nursing at California State University, Fullerton, examined the impact of an eight-week relaxation guided imagery intervention on the sleep quality of 20 mothers of hospitalized, preterm infants.They also looked at the association between sleep quality and maternal distress (perceived stress, depressive symptoms and state anxiety).

Mothers received a CD with three 20-minute relaxation/guided imagery recordings and were asked to listen to at least one of the tracks daily for eight weeks. 

04 Oct

We got this unusual question from a naturopath about her husband, who has a rare condition called hyperacusis. He hears everything much louder than normal, due to a glitch in the cerebral cortex. She wonders how then he can listen to guided imagery and which one. Check it out.

Question:

My husband has an unusual condition called Hyperacusis. He hears everything much louder than normal and always has a loud noise in his brain. The doctors say it actually is a brain condition in the cerebral cortex. It has affected his nervous system. There is more on hyperacusis.net.

My question is, could the PTSD guided imagery possibly help. He can not use headphones but might be able to listen at an extremely low volume. I just don't know which CD to purchase for this. I am a naturopath and have been using your techniques for many years with clients. Your input will be greatly appreciated

03 Oct

The word is out and it’s spreading fast. The Robert W. Coleman School in Baltimore decided to replace their detention room with a mindful meditation room, and got stunningly positive results. Behavior improved. Performance improved. Impulse control got a whole lot better. Life in general improved at Robert W. Coleman.

Not everyone knows this, but here’s the thing: even little kids can meditate – preschoolers, too. And you may be surprised to learn that teenagers take to it like a duck to water. (They’re in a hormone-induced trance state anyway, so it doesn’t take much to get them in the zone.)

30 Sep

Dear BR and Health Journeys,

For eight months, I was a full time caregiver to our severely brain-injured teenage son, after six months of hospitals and a dozen surgeries. He is now confined to a state mental hospital by court order, because of the dangerous behavior caused by the TBI.

When he was home, caring for him was constant, and felt so lonely. I worried no one else could do it as well – and also that he would feel abandoned if it wasn't me there looking after him.

I never got any real rest, because I had to get up every couple hours to check the breathing equipment. I tried to eat well, but I’d end up either overeating junk or forgetting to eat altogether.

I constantly felt inadequate, because I was tired all the time, and craved some kind of joy again in my daily life. I also felt terrified he would die. And of course I worried for my other children, and had trouble letting them out of my sight, for fear they’d get hurt too. 

29 Sep

Researchers from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in Mashhad, Iran, investigated the effect of guided imagery on maternal-fetal attachment in 67 nulliparous women (women with no children) experiencing an unplanned pregnancy. The average woman’s age was 24 years, and most had a high school education.

The women were randomly divided into two intervention groups (n=35) and a control group (n=32). Assessment measures included a demographic form and London, DASS 21, and the Cranley Maternal-Fetal Attachment Questionnaire.

27 Sep

We got this unusual, very interesting question from one of our readers, and thought we’d share it.  She knows she turns people off in social situations, but doesn’t know why or how to stop it and start doing something else.  Check it out.

Question:

Dear BR,

I feel like I’m the opposite of the introverted, socially avoidant person who sidesteps rejection by shying away from people. I’m so outgoing, I turn people off by over-talking and thrusting myself into the middle of everything.

How can I moderate my need to be with people with more subtle, acceptable behavior? I’m in my forties. Is it too late?

Louisa

26 Sep

I’m really looking forward to being at the one and only Healing Beyond Borders conference, held in Colorado Springs between October 6-9th.

If you want to feel the embrace of a wonderful community of gifted healers, while learning some terrific new stuff and getting inspired and tanked up on purpose and meaning, this is the place for you to be.

I’ll be talking about and demonstrating guided imagery for cultivating intuition at my morning keynote on Saturday the 8th, and on guided imagery for healing posttraumatic stress in my workshop that afternoon.