Anxiety, Panic, Phobias Research - Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys http://blog.healthjourneys.com Mon, 22 May 2017 17:29:17 -0400 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Mayo Study Shows Massage Reduces Pain, Anxiety & Tension after Surgery http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/mayo-study-shows-massage-reduces-pain-anxiety-tension-after-surgery.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/mayo-study-shows-massage-reduces-pain-anxiety-tension-after-surgery.html Mayo Study Shows Massage Reduces Pain, Anxiety & Tension after Surgery

In this RCT (randomized, controlled trial) researchers from the Mayo Clinic evaluated the effect of post-operative massage in patients who had undergone abdominal colorectal surgery, and found that it had a consistent, statistically significant, positive effect.

One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive either a 20-min massage (n = 61) or a social visit and relaxation session with no massage; n = 66) on the second and third day after surgery.

Vital signs and psychological well-being (pain, tension, anxiety, satisfaction with care, relaxation) were assessed before and after each intervention.

Analysis of the data shows that postoperative massage significantly improved the patients' perception of pain, tension, and anxiety, but did not change their overall satisfaction with the care they received.

The Mayo investigators conclude that massage may be beneficial during postoperative recovery for patients undergoing abdominal colorectal surgery. But further studies are warranted to better determine the best post-op times to use these interventions and for how long.

Citation: Dreyer NE1, Cutshall SM1, Huebner M2, Foss DM3, Lovely JK4, Bauer BA5, Cima RR3. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, relaxation, and tension after colorectal surgery: A randomized study. Complement Therapies in Clinical Practice. 2015 Aug;21 (3):pages 154-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2015.06.004. Epub 2015 Jun 12. bauer.brent@mayo.edu.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 -0400
Computer-Based CBT Helps Kids & Teens with Anxiety and Depression http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/computer-based-cbt-helps-kids-teens-with-anxiety-and-depression.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/computer-based-cbt-helps-kids-teens-with-anxiety-and-depression.html Computer-Based CBT Helps Kids & Teens with Anxiety and Depression

Researchers from Leuphana University and Friedrich-Alexander University in Germany; VU University and University of Utrecht in the Netherlands; and the Black Dog Institute in Sydney, Australia, conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate whether Computer- and Internet-based cognitive behavioral treatments (cCBT) are effective as a treatment alternative for regular, face-to-face treatment for the symptoms of anxiety and depression in adolescents and young adults.

The research team conducted systematic searches in the databases (Pubmed, Cochrane controlled trial register, PsychInfo) up to 2013. Only randomized controlled trials in which a computer-, internet- or mobile-based cognitive behavioral intervention that targeted either depression, anxiety or both, in children, adolescents and young adults, up to the age of 25, were compared to a control condition.

Searches resulted in identifying 13 randomized trials that included 796 children and adolescents/young adults that met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies were directed at treating anxiety, four studies at depression, and two targeted both anxiety and depression.

The overall mean effect size (Hedges' g) of cCBT on symptoms of anxiety or depression at post-test was g=0.72. The superiority of cCBT over controls was evident for interventions targeting anxiety (p < .001) and for interventions targeting depression (p < .001) as well as for both (p < .001).

The investigators conclude that there is evidence for the efficacy of cCBT in the treatment of anxiety and depressive symptoms in children, adolescents and young adults under 25, and that these interventions may be a promising treatment alternative when evidence based, face-to-face treatment is not feasible. They suggest that future studies should examine long-term effects of these treatments.

Citation: Ebert DD1, Zarski AC2, Christensen H3, Stikkelbroek Y4, Cuijpers P5, Berking M6, Riper H5. Internet and computer-based cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression in youth: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled outcome trials. PLoS One. 2015 Mar 18;10 (3): e0119895. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0119895. eCollection 2015.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 25 Feb 2016 00:00:00 -0500
Relaxation Reduces Anxiety & Depression in Older Adults http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/relaxation-reduces-anxiety-depression-in-older-adults.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/relaxation-reduces-anxiety-depression-in-older-adults.html Relaxation Reduces Anxiety & Depression in Older Adults

Researchers from the National University of Singapore conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the effects of relaxation interventions on anxiety and depression among older adults.

Their comprehensive literature search identified 15 published and non-published studies - 12 RCT's (randomized controlled trials) and three non-randomized controlled trials - undertaken between 1994-2014. Three reviewers selected studies, extracted data, and appraised the methodological quality.

The findings suggested that in most studies, older adults who received relaxation interventions experienced greater reductions in depression and anxiety than controls.

Progressive muscle relaxation training, music therapy, and yoga had the strongest effects on depression. Music, yoga, and combined relaxation training most effectively reduced anxiety symptoms among older adults.

Furthermore, the impact of some relaxation interventions remained in effect for between 14 and 24 weeks after administration.

The investigators conclude that this systematic review supported the positive effects of relaxation interventions on depression and anxiety among older adults. They suggest that health care providers may want to integrate relaxation interventions into standard care for older adults in community and hospital settings.

Citation: Klainin-Yobas P1, Oo WN, Suzanne Yew PY, Lau Y. Effects of relaxation interventions on depression and anxiety among older adults: a systematic review. Aging Mental Health. 2015;19(12):1043-55. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2014.997191. Epub 2015 Jan 9.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 18 Feb 2016 00:00:00 -0500
Six Weeks of Yoga Improves Psychological Health in Older Adults http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/six-weeks-of-yoga-improves-psychological-health-in-older-adults.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/six-weeks-of-yoga-improves-psychological-health-in-older-adults.html Six Weeks of Yoga Improves Psychological Health in Older Adults

Researchers from Walden University in Minneapolis conducted a randomized, controlled study to assess the impact of a yoga intervention on the psychological health of older adults.

Subjects were 98 older adults, ages 65 to 92, randomly assigned to 6 weeks of either chair yoga, chair exercise or a control group condition. They were assessed pre-and post-intervention, and at one month follow-up on their anger, anxiety, depression, morale and self-efficacy.

Measuring instruments used were State Anger Expression Inventory, State Anxiety Inventory, Geriatric Depression Scale, Lawton's PGC Morale Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scales, and Self- Control Schedule.

Yoga participants improved more than either exercise or control participants in anger, anxiety, depression, well-being, general self-efficacy, and self-efficacy for daily living. Changes in self-control moderated changes in psychological health.

The investigators conclude that the potential of 6 weeks of chair yoga for improving psychological health in older adults was supported.

Citation: Bonura KB1, Tenenbaum G. Effects of yoga on psychological health in older adults. Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 2014 Sep;11 (7): pages 1334-41. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2012-0365. Epub 2013 Dec 20.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 12 Nov 2015 00:00:00 -0500
Impact of MBSR on Anxiety & Stress in Healthy Adults: A Systematic Review http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/impact-of-mbsr-on-anxiety-stress-in-healthy-adults-a-systematic-review.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/impact-of-mbsr-on-anxiety-stress-in-healthy-adults-a-systematic-review.html Impact of MBSR on Anxiety & Stress in Healthy Adults: A Systematic Review

Researchers from Harvard and McGill Universities performed a systematic review of studies investigating the impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on stress and anxiety in healthy, nonclinical adults.

A total of 29 studies (n=2668) were included. Effect-size estimates suggested that MBSR is moderately effective in pre-post analyses (n=26; Hedge's g=.55; 95% CI [.44, .66], p<.00001) and in between-group analyses (n=18; Hedge's g=.53; 95% CI [.41, .64], p<.00001).

Outcomes were maintained at an average of 19 weeks of follow-up and the results suggest large effects on stress, moderate effects on anxiety, depression, distress, and quality of life, and small effects on burnout.

When combined, changes in mindfulness and compassion measures correlated with changes in clinical measures at post-treatment and at follow-up.

However, heterogeneity was high, probably due to differences in the study design, the implemented protocol, and the assessed outcomes.

The investigators conclude that MBSR is moderately effective in reducing stress, depression, anxiety and distress, and in ameliorating the quality of life of healthy individuals, but that more research is warranted to identify the most effective elements of this intervention.

Citation: Khoury B1, Sharma M2, Rush SE3, Fournier C4. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for healthy individuals: A meta-analysis. Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2015 Jun;78 (6): pp.519-28. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.03.009. Epub 2015 Mar 20. bkhoury@fas.harvard.edu.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 29 Oct 2015 00:00:00 -0400
Touch & Guided Imagery Reduce Pain & Anxiety after Total Joint Replacement http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/touch-guided-imagery-reduce-pain-anxiety-after-total-joint-replacement.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/touch-guided-imagery-reduce-pain-anxiety-after-total-joint-replacement.html Touch & Guided Imagery Reduce Pain & Anxiety after Total Joint Replacement

Researchers from Saint Clare Health Systems in Dover, New Jersey investigated the effectiveness of the "M" Technique of structured touch (M), compared with guided imagery and usual care, for the reduction of pain and anxiety in patients undergoing elective total knee or hip replacement surgery.

"M" is a registered method of structured touch using a set sequence and number of strokes, and a consistent level of pressure on hands and feet,

The randomized, controlled trial was conducted at a community hospital, with 225 male and female patients, aged 38 to 90 years, undergoing elective total hip or knee replacement. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (75 patients in each): the M structured touch group, the guided imagery group, or treatment as usual.

Outcomes measured were the reduction of pain and anxiety post surgery. Secondary outcomes measured were the amount of pain medication used and a patient satisfaction evaluation.

The study yielded positive findings for the management of pain and anxiety in patients undergoing elective joint replacement in the groups that used M structured touch and guided imagery for 18 to 20 minutes, as compared with usual care.

M showed the largest decreases in both pain and anxiety between groups. There was no significant difference in narcotic pain medication use between groups.

Patient satisfaction survey ratings were highest for M, followed by guided imagery.

Citation: Forward JB1, Greuter NE2, Crisall SJ3, Lester HF4. Effect of Structured Touch and Guided Imagery for Pain and Anxiety in Elective Joint Replacement Patients-A Randomized Controlled Trial: M-TIJRP. Permanente Journal . 2015 Jul 24;19(4). doi: 10.7812/TPP/14-236. ngreuter@cs.com [Epub ahead of print]

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 15 Oct 2015 00:00:00 -0400
Guided Imagery Reduces Depression & Anxiety in Chemo Patients http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/guided-imagery-reduces-depression-anxiety-in-chemo-patients.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/guided-imagery-reduces-depression-anxiety-in-chemo-patients.html Guided Imagery Reduces Depression & Anxiety in Chemo Patients

Researchers from Cyprus University of Technology and the University of Athens conducted a randomized, controlled study, testing the effectiveness of guided imagery and progressive muscle relaxation as stress reducing interventions in 236 patients with prostate and breast cancer who were being treated with chemotherapy.

Subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or the intervention group (PMR and GI), and were observed for a total duration of 3 weeks. In total, 104 were randomized to the control group and 104 to the intervention group.

The measurement tools used were the the SAS questionnaire for anxiety and the BECK-II questionnaire for depression, in addition to collecting two biological markers - saliva cortisol and saliva amylase.
Changes in mean anxiety score and mean depression score in the guided imagery/PMR intervention group were significantly higher than the changes in the control group (b = -29.4, p < 0.001; b = -29.4, p < 0.001, resp.) which were not.

Additionally, the guided imagery group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.30 ± 0.25) gradually dropped up to week 3 (0.16 ± 0.18), while the control group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.21 ± 0.22) gradually increased up to week 3 (0.44 ± 0.35). The same interaction appears for the Amylase levels (p < 0.001).

The investigators conclude that patients with prostate and breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy treatment can benefit from PMR and GI sessions to reduce their anxiety and depression.

Citation: Andreas Charalambous, Margarita Giannakopoulou, Evangelos Bozas, and Lefkios Paikousis. Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2015;2015:270876. doi: 10.1155/2015/270876. Epub 2015 Aug 6.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 08 Oct 2015 00:00:00 -0400
Promising Online Treatment for Teens with Social Anxiety http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/promising-online-treatment-for-teens-with-social-anxiety.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/promising-online-treatment-for-teens-with-social-anxiety.html Promising Online Treatment for Teens with Social Anxiety

Researchers from Örebro University's School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, in Örebro, Sweden, investigated whether the promising results gained by internet-based cognitive behavior therapy with college students suffering from social anxiety and public speaking fears, could also be achieved with high school students.

In this randomized pilot with a pre-test/post-test design, 19 speech-anxious high school students with social anxiety disorder were randomized to either 9 weeks of Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy or to a wait-list control group.

Significant improvements were found on measures of social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Effects were maintained at 1-year follow-up.

The average within- and between-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the primary social anxiety scales at posttest were 0.98 and 1.38, respectively.

However, the average number of completed modules in the CBT program was low.

The researchers conclude that although compliance can use improvement, the results suggest that internet-based guided self-help is effective in the treatment of high school students with SAD

Citation: Tillfors M1, Andersson G, Ekselius L, Furmark T, Lewenhaupt S, Karlsson A, Carlbring P. A randomized trial of Internet-delivered treatment for social anxiety disorder in high school students. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy 2011;40(2):147-57. doi: 10.1080/16506073.2011.555486

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 11 Jun 2015 00:00:00 -0400
Come Get Your Mental Health, at the Screen or on Your Phone! http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/come-get-your-mental-health-at-the-screen-or-on-your-phone.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/come-get-your-mental-health-at-the-screen-or-on-your-phone.html Come Get Your Mental Health, at the Screen or on Your Phone!

Aussies love web and phone based interventions for health education and mental health, and are pre-eminent researchers and evaluators of digital services – probably because flesh and blood providers can be hard to come by in the vast, non-urban areas of this very big country that's also a continent.

This Australian study examines whether mental health self-efficacy (MHSE), a construct from Bandura's Social Learning Theory (SLT), influences the positive results of web-based interventions on such conditions as depression and anxiety.

(MHSE is the belief that we have some agency over our fate, and can master a situation and produce a positive outcome with our own efforts. Web-based interventions, of course, put the end-user in the driver's seat - they themselves execute their own results, at their own pace and on their own time.)

So it stands to reason that if you have strong feelings of self-efficacy, you might do well with an online intervention; and in the reverse, that an online intervention might enhance your feelings of self-efficacy.

In particular, the investigators looked at symptom improvement and functional outcomes of a new mobile phone and web-based psychotherapy intervention for people with mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress.

Data from 49 people with symptoms of depression, anxiety and/or stress in the mild-to-moderate range were used to examine the reliability and validity of a new measure of MHSE, the Mental Health Self-efficacy Scale (MHSES).

Then they conducted a secondary analysis of data from a recently completed randomized controlled trial (N = 720) to evaluate whether MHSE effected post-intervention outcomes, as measured by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS), for people with symptoms in the mild-to-moderate range.

The data from the first study established that the MHSES comprised a unitary factor, with acceptable internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .89) and construct validity. In other words, it was a genuinely separate attribute to measure.

In the second study, the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in MHSE at post-intervention relative to the control conditions (p's < = .000) and investigators determined that MHSE mediated the effects of the intervention on anxiety and stress symptoms.

Furthermore, people with low pre-treatment MHSE reported the greatest post-intervention gains in symptoms of depression, anxiety and overall distress. No effects were found for MHSE on work and social functioning.

The researchers conclude that mental health self-efficacy influences symptom outcomes of a self-guided mobile phone and web-based psychotherapeutic intervention, and may itself be a worthwhile target to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of online treatment programs.

Citation: Clarke J, Proudfoot J, Birch MR, Whitton AE, Parker G, Manicavasagar V, Harrison V, Christensen H, Hadzi-Pavlovic D. Effects of mental health self-efficacy on outcomes of a mobile phone and web intervention for mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety and stress: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry. 2014 Sep 26; 14:272. doi: 10.1186/s12888-014-0272-1.

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 21 May 2015 00:00:00 -0400
Computerized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Works for Anxiety Disorders http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/computerized-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-works-for-anxiety-disorders.html http://blog.healthjourneys.com/hot-research/computerized-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-works-for-anxiety-disorders.html Computerized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Works for Anxiety Disorders

Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine performed a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of computerized CBT (cCBT) for anxiety disorders and the durability of treatment gains during follow-up.

They included randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of cCBT for non-OCD and non-PTSD anxiety disorders, resulting in 40 trials involving 2,648 participants.

Computerized CBT was compared to wait-list, in-person CBT, and Internet control. They also examined moderators of cCBT treatment gains over follow-up.

Meta-analysis indicated that cCBT was significantly more effective than wait-list control in the treatment of anxiety disorders (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.92 [95% CI, 0.83 to 1.02], k = 31, z = 18.8, P < .001).

Moderator analyses also found that cCBT targeting specific anxiety disorders had greater efficacy than that targeting mixed anxiety symptoms.

The efficacy of cCBT was equivalent to in-person CBT in studies that compared them head-to-head, for both children and adults (SMD = 0.05 [95% CI, -0.09 to 0.19], k = 15, z = 0.7, P = .46).

Longitudinal studies showed that individuals undergoing cCBT tended to continue to improve after completion of treatment, with longer follow-up periods associated with greater symptom reduction.

The study concludes that cCBT represents an efficacious intervention for the treatment of anxiety disorders and may circumvent barriers to accessing traditional CBT treatments, such as a lack of practitioners.

Citation Adelman CB, Panza KE, Bartley CA, Bontempo A, Bloch MH1. A meta-analysis of computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy for the treatment of DSM-5 anxiety disorders. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;75 (7):e695-704. doi: 10.4088/JCP.13r08894. michael.bloch@yale.edu

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emediacy@gmail.com (Belleruth Naparstek) Hot Research Thu, 26 Mar 2015 00:00:00 -0400