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Here is another question from the Prevention discussion boards on intuition from a worry-prone woman

21 Jun
Here is another question from the Prevention discussion boards on intuition from a worry-prone woman trying to sort out when she’s having a genuine premonition as opposed to when she’s just worrying..
Question:

I notice that a lot of the time-- when I don''t hear from someone for a while or a family member is traveling, I get the feeling that something bad is going to happen. How can I tell at the time when it''s intuition or just me worrying too much?



Answer:

It''s great you know you''re a worrier. This means you''re wise to second guess these "feelings" about your loved ones, which, as you say, may be just an extension of your tendency to worry.

To get some clarity on this, I would start tracking - on paper - your "hits" and your "misses". Keep a record of your worries (who, when, where) and how they pan out - or don''t. This will help you get some perspective on this, based on your own hard data.

An additional thing you might want to try is notice how it feels in your body when you have these "feelings" and write that down too. Then, after a couple of weeks or months, take a look at when time proved you right and when it proved you wrong, and see if there was a difference between how you felt on the inside when you had a worry and how it felt when you had an intuitive sense.

For some people this is very telling. The worry often feels more like tightness, contraction, discomfort; the hunch can feel more open, flowing or expansive; or else, it can feel like nothing special at all, like sandwichmom''s blinking!

Hope this helps.

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award