Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys

You are here: Home Ask Belleruth What Are Good Resources for Dissociative Identity Disorder?

What Are Good Resources for Dissociative Identity Disorder?

02 Jul

Question:

I have been in "recovery" for over 25 years. I was diagnosed with DID (MPD) about 4 years ago and was given Belleruth's CD on trauma. I am wondering if there are additional materials that could help me sort through this. The trauma CD has been helpful, but wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything. I have used the affirmations previously, but started the guided imagery and am excited about the changes I am feeling.

Also, I recently started living closer to my daughter and was wondering if it's appropriate to tell her. She is very perceptive and I believe she has some idea. I am concerned about how and if to discuss it with her. I understand the diagnosis and would be able to share details with her and possibly suggest some reading that would shed more light on the subject.

Hope this isn't too much to ask. I am not employed right now so unable to consult a therapist.

Thank you in advance.

Dalia

Dear Dalia,

First of all, if you’re sensing positive inner changes from the Healing Trauma imagery, stick with it.  It’s the most targeted imagery we’ve got it’s gotten strong results for the most part, and it’s complex enough to take a long time for people to get tired of it.  You may want to interlace your listening, however, with something less intense but calming, self-regulating and anxiety reducing, such as Relaxation & Wellness or Relieve Stress.  This will give you some variety and also more tools to deal with any triggering you might experience.

Additionally, anything you can do to connect with your core and your body would be good for helping you in your journey of integrating your multiple selves into a single, strong, cohesive personality.  So, for instance, you may want to consider working with the exercises on Suzanne Scurlock-Durana’s Healing from the Core series, either the short or the long version.  You’ll be cultivating body awareness, energy management, mood balance and resilience with this.  Other body based moving meditations might be useful for the same reason – Yoga or Qigong, for instance.  But don’t overwhelm yourself with a ton of stuff – take it slow and steady. This integration process will take a while and there’s no need to rush it.

Sooner or later, you’d benefit greatly from going back to working with a therapist, so do explore what free services there are in your community.

As for telling your daughter, I’d take it slowly there too.  Wait for clues that she’s in fact interested in having this conversation, and it’s not just for your sake that you’re doing this.  You don’t want to impose the subject on her if this is a time in her life when she already has a lot on her plate with family, work, finances or other stressors, and doesn’t need to be working your agenda on top it all – this can wait for when she’s ready. Your job is to watch and wait and be respectful of her boundaries.  (The danger of raising it on the heels of your just having moved closer to her is that you’ll be communicating to her that it’s now her job to look after you. That could be overwhelming and not entirely appropriate.)

I hope this is useful to you. I wish you the very best of luck.

Belleruth

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award