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Belleruth Naparstek

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award.

Researchers from Cardiff University, Trinity College and University College London in the U.K., conducted a pilot study investigating the impact of Neurofeedback (NF) and Motor Training (MOT) on the brain networks that could improve motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease patients.

This 10-week small Phase I randomized controlled trial had 30 PD patients participating. Group One (n = 15) received real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) with motor training. Group Two received motor training alone. 

Friday, 01 April 2016 00:00

Anita Ashland: Rebel Without A Mantra!

Okay, not only did this article by Anita Ashland get 4.5 BR stars for wit, irony and arch social commentary, it served as a great reminder that it's never a great idea to take yourself or what you do too seriously.

This applies to all Mind-Body Missionaries, my own self included.

This piece appeared in the Herald Independent of Cottage Grove, Wisconsin, and I think it deserves wider exposure, so here we are at hj, doing our part in letting more people enjoy it.

Let us know how you feel about one funny, non-meditating woman's reaction to all the mind-body advice going around the zeitgeist, on how to best practice yoga, meditation, guided imagery and relaxation.

A hearty OMMMM to you and enjoy!

Belleruth

p.s. If you liked this post, you might enjoy getting our weekly e-news with other articles just like it. If so, sign up here!

Thursday, 31 March 2016 00:00

Guided Imagery Short-Circuits Food Cravings

Researchers from Plymouth University in the UK tested Elaborated Intrustion Theory (EI), - the idea that food cravings happen when an involuntary thought about an appealing food (generated either by seeing it, smelling it or some other external prompt; or by internal sensations of hunger, anxiety, fatigue, etc) gets elaborated by strong, multisensory and inherently rewarding "mental images" of that food – the way it looks, tastes, smells, feels and even sounds – wonderfully described as a kind of imaginary relish that produces a form of exquisite torture.

We got this query from a therapist looking for resources for ADHD. He didn't specify the age group he was working with, so we gave him a range of suggestions that covered all the bases. We also reminded him that recent research shows that any steady practice of mindfulness meditation has been found to help with this.

Dear Belleruth,

I am a clinical social worker in private practice. My question: do you offer a product that is specific for ADHD (Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder).

Best,

Ray M, LCSW

Monday, 28 March 2016 00:00

Huzzah!! New Catalogs Are Here!!

2016-HJ-Catalog

Hey, folks,

So, yes, finally – multo boxes of our new hj catalogs were delivered to our warehouse, and dropped at the post office last week. If you're on our mailing list, your copy is no doubt winging its way to you.

We know that your patient and gracious selves have been waiting for them for way too long. Cheryl and Maggie - always the champions and advocates for The Paper People (generally those of us of a certain age) - are especially glad for their arrival.

You'll find some fine new stuff in there: more, wonderful guided imagery from Peg Doyle, for starters – Beyond Cancer, some guided meditations for survivors of the Oncology Wars who are done with treatment and/or in remission, but still terrorized by check-ups, scans and doctors' visits.

And we finally found something we've been looking for, for quite a while now – some thoughtful, sensitive guided imagery for Grieving the Loss of a Pet by Karen Adele Litzinger.

Researchers from Colorado State University and the National Institutes of Health examined the relationship between dispositional mindfulness to binge eating and associated eating attitudes and behaviors among adolescent girls at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D).

One hundred fourteen overweight or obese girls with a family history of T2D and mild depressive symptoms were enrolled in the study.

The researchers collected adolescent self-reports of mindfulness, eating in the absence of hunger, and depressive symptoms. They also interviewed them to determine presence of binge eating episodes, and used a behavioral task to assess the reinforcing value of food vs. other non-snack food rewards. They also assessed body composition through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

This is a deliciously touching story. It's so good, it went and got us all weepy.

A 340 pound man with Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure through the roof, and another five years before his doc predicted he'd drop, had become socially isolated and locked in a shell. After an especially distressing incident on a plane, he decided to adopt an overweight, middle aged rescue dog, so they'd have something in common....

Please watch this, if you want to enjoy a wonderful, full-hearted lift that will stick with you all day. Really.

Question:

Do you have guided imagery for weight loss and/or positive body image? Or can you recommend one?

Thanks.
Philomena

Hello, Philomena.

Yes, absolutely. Best for weight loss, if I do say so myself, is our HJ Weight Loss imagery - it doubled weight loss in a controlled study at Canyon Ranch.

Wow, and to think, we were all bemoaning the mean-spirited nuttiness of the electoral process of 2 years ago! Remember this post?

I guess that was just a warm-up for what's going on now. Who knew?

At the time, wellness mavin and holistic Chicago doc, Martha Howard MD called it PEST or Pre-Election Stress Trauma.

Bestselling author Priscilla Warner wrote a blog piece about Political Punditry Panic Attacks.

In this RCT (randomized, controlled trial) researchers from the Mayo Clinic evaluated the effect of post-operative massage in patients who had undergone abdominal colorectal surgery, and found that it had a consistent, statistically significant, positive effect.

One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive either a 20-min massage (n = 61) or a social visit and relaxation session with no massage; n = 66) on the second and third day after surgery.

Vital signs and psychological well-being (pain, tension, anxiety, satisfaction with care, relaxation) were assessed before and after each intervention.

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