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Belleruth Naparstek

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award.

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BN075I was delighted to be reminded last week of some of the creative ways guided imagery can be combined with other healing techniques to produce extra-potent results.

A note from a licensed massage therapist at a rehab facility for neurological disorders recently wrote that she began playing guided imagery - her client's choice from an ample menu - during her aromatherapy massages, and how astonishingly effective the combination was. She reported that the one intervention enhanced the positive impact of the other, resulting in a whole that was far greater than its two parts. She calls her newly minted program "Meditative Massage", and she's pumped about it.

This put in mind a Scripps study, published by Guarneri et al in the journal Military Medicine (http://blog.healthjourneys.com/update-from-belleruth/scripps-study-rocks-world-of-standard-care-for-combat-stress.html) with a population of traumatized Marines between deployments, where the combination of our Healing Trauma (please link) guided imagery and a 3 sessions of a respected biofield therapy called Healing Touch produced an astonishing drop in PTS symptoms in just 3 short weeks - a stunning outcome.

We frequently hear from yoga instructors who play 15 minutes of guided imagery during shavasana, the relaxing, integrative, cool down phase at the end of their classes. They report that this is an added healing component that deepens and enriches their sessions.

Shortly after 9/11, we heard from two clinical social workers who worked with fire fighters, who had zero interest in talking about their feelings. These inspired practitioners instead introduced them to a double-whammy combination of behavioral methods: guided imagery plus EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing). While listening to the guided imagery for Relaxation & Wellness and Healing Trauma, they were taught to tap on alternate legs (or arms) to the beat of the narrative - the critical element is that it's bilateral - you could even move your tongue to either side of your mouth. That was just the ticket for these macho fire fighters: they could stand to do it, and it reduced their distress.

So, talk to us! What other inspired solutions are out there that we need to know about? Can you share your creative solutions with us, and inspire a whole new round of clinical invention?

Hats off to all of you, and happy new year!

Belleruth

Researchers from Budapest, Hungary analyzed the evidence regarding efficacy of preventative treatments, delivered immediately after a traumatic event, designed to prevent the later acquisition of posttraumatic stress.

A search was conducted in ProQuest, PILOTS, PubMed, and Web of Science for studies published between 2005 and 2015.

Twenty-one trials were identified, of which 6 presented interventions delivered within 72 hours post trauma, and the rest delivered within the first month.

Dear Belleruth,

I was in a bad car accident in October. I am doing much better and could possibly be released to drive and return to work in a couple of weeks.

I am having a bit of trouble sleeping, and know that after being unable to drive for 6 weeks, I will be feeling panicky about driving.

Which of your titles would be helpful for this panicky feeling? I do own some of your titles and know they have helped in the past.

Carol Ann

It's not that this TEDX talk from cardiologist Michael Rocha has such spanking new insights about what a healthy lifestyle can do for your heart - Dean Ornish established most of these guidelines over 20 years ago. But it's well said, sincerely offered and quite motivating. Think of it as a great way to start the new year!

p.s. If you liked this post, you might enjoy getting our weekly e-news with other articles just like it. If so, sign up here!

Well, happy new year, everyone!

Health Journeys is embarking on an exciting year, with many profound opportunities and initiatives in place for 2016.

I'll be spelling out many of these new projects in the weeks and months ahead. But for now, I want to tell you about a request we just got from Heather Barahmand, a retired U.S. servicewoman and gutsy humanitarian, who is heading back to Iraq through an organization named Yazda (www.yadza.org), to help traumatized Yazidi women who escaped from ISIS captivity. Yazda gladly accepts donations and welcomes anything you can do to help spread the word about their much needed services.

As you can imagine, the women have faced unspeakable horrors. These are women and girls as young as 9, many of whom were snatched out of their villages and homes to be held captive, abused, beaten, raped, demeaned, and even sold as sex slaves to the highest bidder, often multiple times.

Friday, 01 January 2016 01:00

Happy 2016 from Health Journeys

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In this pilot study, an investigator from Lehman College of the City University of New York in The Bronx, NY, studied the impact of training children with sickle disease to use brief guided imagery segments to better deal with their pain episodes.

The children were trained with an audio recording of guided imagery messages, which they listened to for 5 to 10 minutes, three times each day, regardless of pain and also during pain episodes.

Dear Health Journeys,

I want to thank you for all the fantastic material you offer. I am an LMT (Licensed Massage Therapist), working at a large rehab facility.

Recently, I launched a program called "Meditative Massage", in which clients receive a gentle, slow flowing aromatherapy massage while listening to the guided imagery topic of their choice.

While this is not for everyone, most of my clients are loving it. It's unique, and no other facility or spa has a program like this.

We got this inspiring note from a creative massage therapist who put together a potent combo of healing ingredients. Read on!

Dear Health Journeys,

I want to thank you for all the fantastic material you offer. I am an LMT (Licensed Massage Therapist), working at a large rehab facility.

Recently, I launched a program called "Meditative Massage", in which clients receive a gentle, slow flowing aromatherapy massage while listening to the guided imagery topic of their choice.

Hello again.

I was delighted to be reminded last week of all the creative ways guided imagery can be combined with other healing techniques to produce extra-potent results.

A note from a licensed massage therapist at a rehab facility for neurological disorders and injuries in New York told of how she played targeted guided imagery during her aromatherapy massages, and how effective it was for most of her clients. She calls her newly minted program "Meditative Massage".