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11 Mar

We got this lovely note from a nurse practitioner in a GYN practice, who inspired us to take her lead and develop our own prescription pads. Check it out!

Dear Belleruth,

nancy-longI am an ovarian cancer survivor and a nurse practitioner in gynecology GYN. I also am Volunteer Chair of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

I buy your CDs and give them to women going thru surgery and chemo.

One of my friends sent me these cards with my very favorite quote from you. When I say it or even think it, my shoulders relax! {Ed. Note: the affirmation is "I know I am held in the hands of God and am perfectly, utterly safe."]

Thank you for all of your wonderful healing work. I often write your website and name on a prescription for my patients.

I play your CD's in my survivor groups.

Thanks so very much.

Nancy Long

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01 Mar

A chemo patient likes the affirmations on the guided imagery program she listens to during her infusions, but wonders what is meant by the statement, "I know I can heal myself and live or I can heal myself and die: my physical condition is not an indication of my wholeness", and BR explains what she meant by it.

Question:

I have finally found the perfect affirmations for me, just one thing I am confused about In your Chemo disc, you say you can heal yourself and live or heal yourself and die......would you kindly explain what you mean by 'heal yourself and die'?

23 Feb

We got this query from the friend of a woman about to begin months of intensive chemotherapy. The friend who wrote felt she had benefited greatly from guided imagery during her own bout with cancer, so she wanted her friend to have the same experience. But her friend has severe hearing loss. She wondered how an audio intervention could possibly work.

Question:

First of all, thank you. When I went through chemotherapy, your meditation CDs were a lifesaver (or at least a sleep-saver). My oncology rehab program used them at the end of our exercise sessions, and after a few weeks, my brain was trained to get sleepy when I started the recording.

Now I have a friend about to enter intensive, months' long treatment, and I'd like her to have the same benefit. However, she has severe hearing loss, only hearing with the help of an implant -- and as a result, I suspect that something that is mostly auditory would not be relaxing for her.

16 Feb

We got this question from a Mom dealing with multiple stresses from all directions. She's a cancer survivor herself, with a disabled adult son who finds changes in routine difficult, and a husband probably facing bone marrow transplantation ....

Question:

Do you hve any materials for parents of children with disabilities? My adult son has a severe genetic disorder and his father is in chemo for multiple myeloma. The chemo appears to be working well at this point.

As you can imagine, my son is wonderful, but he cannot understand the implications or be part of a support system. As a bone marrow transplant becomes more and more a reality, I need to reassure him that things will be OK, but different.

My son has a chromosomal disorder. He is verbal, extremely intelligent, does basic math in his head, has an incredible memory and a dry sense of humor. He is the highest producing employee at his sheltered workshop and a joy to be with. Verbalizing feelings is very difficult for him, as are changes in routine.

I myself am a breast cancer survivor in my early 70's.

Thanks. Dorrie

26 Jun

This note arrived in the mailbox, and this is definitely not the first time we've heard these sentiments. There's something to be said for having your heart cracked wide open by all the love, care and appreciation that can surround a person who knows he/she is dying. Read on:

"I am a 69 year old man, in the hospital at the moment getting 5 days of chemotherapy treatment for another recurrence of a cancer that I've been fighting for 5 years. Realistically speaking, I probably have less than 6 months to live.

"I have an inspiring story of my own although it is obviously not about finding a miracle cure. I want to tell about the importance of friends and family, how they make all the difference, even though they can't cure this disease. I have been transformed by their love, concern and generous giving of time and work to me and my wife. It overwhelms me at times in a good way.

"I have always been a strong, silent type but lately my heart is touched many times a day. Tears fill my eyes from the affection and kindness people show. I understand I matter to them and that I contributed to their lives in a positive way. It is as if I can see myself and my life from outside myself, and it looks good. I am a happy man.

"My dear wife of 48 years shakes her head at the new me. My two daughters and son-in-law as well. I have meaningful conversations like never before. I thought this would be a worthwhile perspective for your readers. Blessings.

Sincerely,

Robert M.

25 Jun

Researchers from Mind Matters Research in Anchorage, Alaska, conducted a multi-site randomized trial to evaluate the impact on quality of life (QOL) benefits of an imagery-based group intervention titled 'Envision the Rhythms of Life'(ERL).

Breast cancer survivors more than 6 weeks post-treatment were randomized to attend either five weekly, 4-hour group sessions at a community center with therapist present (live delivery (LD), n = 48), or with the therapist streamed via telemedicine (telemedicine delivery (TD), n = 23), or to a waitlist control (WL) group (n = 47).

Weekly individual phone calls to encourage at-home practice began at session one and continued until the 3-month follow-up.

Seven self-report measures of QOL were examined at baseline, 1-month and 3-month post-treatment times, including health-related and breast cancer-specific QOL, fatigue, cognitive function, spirituality, distress, and sleep.

15 May

My inspiring story doesn't have to do with mind-body CDs, although I'm a satisfied user of guided imagery, yoga and meditation. This is about the people I work with.

I'm a 42 year old husband and father, recently diagnosed with stomach cancer. I have worked for the same small business for the past 12 years. Currently I am facing several rounds of chemotherapy, with little sick leave left, because earlier this year, my wife had to undergo back surgery. I was needed to help at home. It never crossed my mind that I might need those sick days for myself. I never got sick.

My co-workers got together with our manager and figured out a way to donate their own sick days to me, so I won't lose salary when I am too sick to work. I now have 34 extra days, if I need them. Each person gave whatever they could spare. The relief my wife and I felt was indescribable.

Every time I think about their generosity and love, my eyes fill with tears. This kindness may be what cures me, more than any chemotherapy treatment. I post this story with you, because it reminds us all of the good we are capable of.

Gratefully,

Tom P.

12 May

Belleruth,

My husband died from lung cancer in 2011 and not three months later I myself was diagnosed with colon cancer.

I have many of your CD's (I don't know if I could have gotten through treatment without them, by the way) and listen to one or another of them at bedtime, every night.
Something I really wish you would address in a future CD is something to help with the fear of recurrence. Things always seem so much worse at night, when you are alone in the dark. That fear is not the same thing as anxiety. Please consider this.

Best,
Denise

05 May

Hi
If you don't definitely have cancer, but doctors think you might (tests are still being done) will listening to the Cancer MP3 help or would it focus my mind on Cancer and end of doing harm?

Thanks for your response!

Catherine

02 Apr

Researchers from the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, compared the effectiveness of two different interventions for distressed survivors of breast cancer – group mindfulness meditation training with yoga vs. supportive-expressive group therapy.

This multisite, randomized controlled trial assigned 271 distressed survivors of stage I to III breast cancer to either a Mindfulness Based Cancer Recovery group (MBCR), a Supportive-Expressive Therapy Group (SET), or a 1-day stress management control condition.

MBCR focused on training in mindfulness meditation and gentle yoga, whereas SET focused on emotional expression and group support. Both intervention groups included 18 hours of professional contact.