Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys

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25 Mar

We got this really beautiful note from a man who’d suffered the terrible loss of his soul-mate and life partner to complications from Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. It’s a wonderfully honest and eloquent description of a person’s journey through grief and heartbreak to healing and growth - and very inspiring. Here it is:

“This isn't a question - it's a great big Thank You Note!

“My soul-mate and life partner, died due to complications from chemo and radiation treatments for Non-Hodgkins lymphoma (actual cause of death was end-stage lung disease - not a nice condition). “She was diagnosed with NHL in 1998 and had multiple therapies. However, her remissions were never long lasting. Towards the end of her physical life, we had some really awesome conversations, and I was able to hear her beautiful wishes for me.  I made sure she knew what an honor it was for me to be her caregiver and to walk beside her during our time together. She was a beautiful, happy woman, my little bird, and I miss her very much.
25 Feb

We found this post from Rosie on Amazon.  Now, we know perfectly well that this generous description credits a lot to the guided imagery; and that nobody can know for sure what made this experience go so well.  Rosie does mention the importance of diet and nutrition, too.

But then again, on the other hand, we sure do hear a lot of feedback that sounds just like this… We figure that guided imagery is particularly well suited for surgery and other medical procedures – that much we can say with some assurance.  Here’s Rosie’s note:

Wow...thats all I can say.

I was diagnosed with Cervical Cancer 1B2 a few months ago. I underwent a radical hysterectomy combined with femoral hernia repair 10 days ago.

14 Jan

Investigators from the Continuum Cancer Centers of the New York Beth Israel Medical Center evaluated the impact of guided imagery on patients undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer.

Eligible patients receiving guided imagery sessions were monitored via biofeedback before and after each session. Measures included blood pressure, respiration rate, pulse rate, and skin temperature.
 
In addition, the EuroQoL Group's EQ-5D health questionnaire was used for subjective assessment and patient feedback was collected at the end of radiation therapy through a satisfaction survey.

Measured parameters revealed statistically significant improvement from baseline, with decreases noted in respiration rate and pulse rate as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Skin temperature increased, indicating more peripheral capillary flow as a result of a decrease in the sympathetic response.

10 Dec

Researchers from the Continuum Cancer Center at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York evaluated the impact of guided imagery on patients undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer.

Eligible patients receiving guided imagery sessions were monitored via biofeedback before and after each session. Monitored measures included blood pressure, respiration rate, pulse rate, and skin temperature.

In addition, the EuroQoL Group's EQ-5D questionnaire was used for subjective assessment; and patient feedback was collected at the end of radiation therapy through a satisfaction survey.

10 Sep

Listening to guided imagery helped me so much 4 years ago when I was dealing with breast cancer. I am a cancer thriver today, even though the chemicals were debilitating, I never missed a night of sleep using that chemo CD and restful sleep CD.

I found in the process that I was more auditory, and use affirmations now. Guided imagery helped but was a little more difficult for me to do.

These audio programs and the experience of cancer profoundly affected my life, so that each day I wake up with gratitude. I also continue to find the daily, mundane tasks in life so profound. This has not changed in four years and I do not believe it will for the rest of my life (and I plan to live a long time).

13 Aug

Dear Belleruth Napastek (sic),

I have to tell you of the wonderful support you have offered me. The chemo meditation is terrific. I was diagnosed with appendicial cancer, Stage 4, in early March of this year.  I thank you for your amazing Chemotherapy imagery. I could have not done the last 2 chemo infusions without it, plus using the Chemo-Related Fatigue meditation as well, before the next surgery.

I started FOLFOX chemo in April for 5 sessions, over 10 weeks.  Gained 10 pounds. Go figure!

The amazing news is that the type of signet ring cancer cells that I have, only respond to chemotherapy in about 5% of the cases.  

However, when I recently underwent HIPEC (heated infusion of chemo) in the abdomen, the only thing the surgeon could find was some OLD DEAD cancer cells on my lower intestines.

So I was one of the 5% percent.   But we knew that. .....

The words and power behind the guided mediation has resonated right down to my DNA.  Not too shabby for a woman who is healing seven generations of my family, with limited personal knowledge of who my ancestors were.

Thank you again for the amazing impact on my life, my healing.

Sincerely, my prayers that God continues to keep you in your highest good.

Felicia from Warrington, PA

30 Apr

I listened to your guided imagery program for Caregiver Stress for months as I walked an arduous path with my dearest love of 40 years, as she contended with the stresses and strains of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.  It was not easy.  She is now thankfully in remission.  

Voice, music and words provided exactly what I needed, and therefore what we needed.  The intense fear, doubt, suffering, emotional exhaustion etc etc of the care partner is unacknowledged, ignored, swept under the rug.

30 Apr

A woman who has been on chemo for cancer is now facing surgery, then more chemo.  She was given a stack of CDs but wonders when to use what, and if it’s a mistake to listen to everything at once.  Here is her question.

Question:

I have been on chemotherapy for breast cancer for the last 7 weeks.  A few days ago I found the chemo imagery that was given to me when I started.  (I wasn't exactly keeping up with everything.)  Surgery is in 5 days.  I was wondering, is it wasteful to incorporate several CDs at once into the process (e.g. the Cancer, the Surgery, and the Chemotherapy CD) or should I just stick with the Chemo tape?  I'm going back on the Chemo immediately after.

Debbie

26 Mar

This prayer was written by Eitan Baum for the healing of his mother, Naomi Chava bat Chaya Hendel in Menachem Av of the year 5771 or 2011 by the Gregorian Calendar.  It is very much in the style and wording of Jewish prayer.

Wayfarers Prayer upon Embarking on the Journey of Healing

May it be Your will, merciful and healing Father, to lead me on this journey in peace, to accompany me in peace, to stand by my side and to give me life, health, happiness and peace.

Give me the strength to bear this cancer with dignity, and the power to endure it and be healed.  Protect me from pain, sadness and despair, and from all the discomforts that are drawing near. Send skill, wisdom and understanding to my doctors and nurses, Your faithful messengers, to sow goodness and light in my body. Help the chemicals accurately do their work, rooting out disease and bringing compassion to the healthy parts of my body making room for the good to strengthen and take root.

19 Mar

Hey, so take a look at a serious contender for Most Adorable Kid in America and read his story, which we found on a website called Alex’s Lemonade Stand: Fighting Cancer One Cup at a Time…Awesome that he can flash that radiant smile and exude such radically cute charisma, after being through what he’s been through – but there you have it.  Definitely makes you want to complain less…check this story out:
 
When Corey was 1-year-old, he was diagnosed with stage 1 Wilms' tumor, a pediatric kidney cancer. A 2 pound tumor was removed, along with his right kidney and some lymph nodes.
 
Unfortunately, just 3 months after finishing chemotherapy treatments, Corey's cancer relapsed to his lungs and lower spine area. He was paralyzed for a few weeks until the new chemotherapy and radiation treatments started working. After finishing an intensive 24 week protocol that kept Corey in the hospital most of the time, Corey enjoyed 10 months of being cancer-free and relearned how to walk.