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Chemotherapy (27)

01 Mar

A chemo patient likes the affirmations on the guided imagery program she listens to during her infusions, but wonders what is meant by the statement, "I know I can heal myself and live or I can heal myself and die: my physical condition is not an indication of my wholeness", and BR explains what she meant by it.

Question:

I have finally found the perfect affirmations for me, just one thing I am confused about In your Chemo disc, you say you can heal yourself and live or heal yourself and die......would you kindly explain what you mean by 'heal yourself and die'?

16 Feb

We got this question from a Mom dealing with multiple stresses from all directions. She's a cancer survivor herself, with a disabled adult son who finds changes in routine difficult, and a husband probably facing bone marrow transplantation ....

Question:

Do you hve any materials for parents of children with disabilities? My adult son has a severe genetic disorder and his father is in chemo for multiple myeloma. The chemo appears to be working well at this point.

As you can imagine, my son is wonderful, but he cannot understand the implications or be part of a support system. As a bone marrow transplant becomes more and more a reality, I need to reassure him that things will be OK, but different.

My son has a chromosomal disorder. He is verbal, extremely intelligent, does basic math in his head, has an incredible memory and a dry sense of humor. He is the highest producing employee at his sheltered workshop and a joy to be with. Verbalizing feelings is very difficult for him, as are changes in routine.

I myself am a breast cancer survivor in my early 70's.

Thanks. Dorrie

18 Sep

Elizabeth just got this thank you note and update from one of the inspired folks she got to know over the phone. We're posting it here to show the range of uses one clever, generous and inventive oncology patient can get out of guided imagery and other mind-body techniques. Her use of ritual and opting to wish others well on the chemo unit – well, it's very heart-warming and inspiring. Check it out.

Here's the note, edited down just a bit for size:

Howdy, E !

I am finished with radiation & feeling a bit like Hiroshima. I am at the 10 month date for treatment & I can't tell you how much your support has been, literally, a Godsend.

31 Mar

Investigators from San Diego State University (SDSU) & University of California, San Diego (UCSD), conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effects of randomized, controlled yoga interventions on self-reported fatigue in cancer patients and survivors. The online electronic databases, PubMed and PsycINFO, were used to search for peer-reviewed research articles reporting on randomized, controlled studies.

The main outcome of interest was change in fatigue from pre- to post-intervention. Interventions of any length were included in the analysis. Risk of bias using the format of the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was also examined across studies.

Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and involved a total of 583 participants who were predominantly female, breast cancer survivors.

24 Mar

Dear BR,
I was given your audio for surgery and also for cancer. Following 9 hours of surgery for Stage IV ovarian cancer, I also had 10 months of chemotherapy.  

I listened to the cancer imagery twice a day, every day – once to the guided imagery track and once to the affirmations. I believe this was a critical piece of my healing.

I am now cancer-free and am watching the Bernie Siegel video, Affirmations for Living Beyond Cancer.  I plan to continue my devotional regime, using these titles, as I am confident that this ongoing work on my part will be critical in keeping me cancer-free.  I intend to live a very long, long time.

Thank you for creating these resources.  I’m delighted that they are being used in more and more hospitals and other settings.  

Sincerely,
Karen I.

14 Oct

Probably the most frequent thanks we get is from someone who was really scared – someone who used our guided imagery to get a sense of calm mastery and control over their anxiety and fear.  Often that was facing surgery, chemotherapy or a tough diagnosis;  or it could be a condition that is in and of itself based on anxiety – panic attacks, OCD, posttraumatic stress and so forth.  

Here’s an article that was dropped in my mail box about a patient at Beaumont Hospital System in Durango CO, who used imagery to face down some very tough and scary cancer treatments.  

Do have a look if you’ve got the time.  It’s a fast but inspiring read.  Just click here.

25 Mar

We got this really beautiful note from a man who’d suffered the terrible loss of his soul-mate and life partner to complications from Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. It’s a wonderfully honest and eloquent description of a person’s journey through grief and heartbreak to healing and growth - and very inspiring. Here it is:

“This isn't a question - it's a great big Thank You Note!

“My soul-mate and life partner, died due to complications from chemo and radiation treatments for Non-Hodgkins lymphoma (actual cause of death was end-stage lung disease - not a nice condition). “She was diagnosed with NHL in 1998 and had multiple therapies. However, her remissions were never long lasting. Towards the end of her physical life, we had some really awesome conversations, and I was able to hear her beautiful wishes for me.  I made sure she knew what an honor it was for me to be her caregiver and to walk beside her during our time together. She was a beautiful, happy woman, my little bird, and I miss her very much.
10 Sep

Listening to guided imagery helped me so much 4 years ago when I was dealing with breast cancer. I am a cancer thriver today, even though the chemicals were debilitating, I never missed a night of sleep using that chemo CD and restful sleep CD.

I found in the process that I was more auditory, and use affirmations now. Guided imagery helped but was a little more difficult for me to do.

These audio programs and the experience of cancer profoundly affected my life, so that each day I wake up with gratitude. I also continue to find the daily, mundane tasks in life so profound. This has not changed in four years and I do not believe it will for the rest of my life (and I plan to live a long time).

13 Aug

Dear Belleruth Napastek (sic),

I have to tell you of the wonderful support you have offered me. The chemo meditation is terrific. I was diagnosed with appendicial cancer, Stage 4, in early March of this year.  I thank you for your amazing Chemotherapy imagery. I could have not done the last 2 chemo infusions without it, plus using the Chemo-Related Fatigue meditation as well, before the next surgery.

I started FOLFOX chemo in April for 5 sessions, over 10 weeks.  Gained 10 pounds. Go figure!

The amazing news is that the type of signet ring cancer cells that I have, only respond to chemotherapy in about 5% of the cases.  

However, when I recently underwent HIPEC (heated infusion of chemo) in the abdomen, the only thing the surgeon could find was some OLD DEAD cancer cells on my lower intestines.

So I was one of the 5% percent.   But we knew that. .....

The words and power behind the guided mediation has resonated right down to my DNA.  Not too shabby for a woman who is healing seven generations of my family, with limited personal knowledge of who my ancestors were.

Thank you again for the amazing impact on my life, my healing.

Sincerely, my prayers that God continues to keep you in your highest good.

Felicia from Warrington, PA

30 Apr

I listened to your guided imagery program for Caregiver Stress for months as I walked an arduous path with my dearest love of 40 years, as she contended with the stresses and strains of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.  It was not easy.  She is now thankfully in remission.  

Voice, music and words provided exactly what I needed, and therefore what we needed.  The intense fear, doubt, suffering, emotional exhaustion etc etc of the care partner is unacknowledged, ignored, swept under the rug.