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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (3)

03 May

Researchers from the Technische Universität München in Munich, Germany investigated the efficacy of a brief relaxation technique consisting of functional relaxation (FR) and guided imagery (GI) in adult asthmatics in a randomized controlled trial.

Sixty-four patients with extrinsic bronchial asthma (externally caused, usually from inhaled allergens) were treated over a 4-week period and assessed at baseline, after treatment, and after 4 months, for follow-up.

Sixteen patients completed the functional relaxation, fourteen the guided imagery, and fifteen a combination of both.  Thirteen received a placebo relaxation technique as the control intervention (CI). Primary outcome measures were forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV(1)] as well as specific airway resistance [sR(aw)].

23 Sep

Researchers from The University of Washington find that heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback, plus walking with pulse oximetry feedback, improves functioning and quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Researchers from The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at The University of Washington, Seattle examined whether heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback and walking with pulse oximetry feedback could improve functioning and quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Twenty patients with COPD participated in 5 weekly sessions of HRV biofeedback and 4 weekly sessions of walking practice with oximetry feedback, with instructions for daily home practice.

09 Aug

Researchers from Tai Po Hospital in Hong Kong explored the effects of guided imagery and relaxation in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using a randomized controlled design. Half of 26 participants were allocated to the treatment group, consisting of six practice sessions of guided imagery, while the control group was instructed to rest quietly during the six sessions.

At the seventh session, physiological measures were taken and compared to previously, to see if there were any changes in partial percentage of oxygen saturation, heart rate, upper thoracic surface electromyography, skin conductance and peripheral skin temperature.