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Coping skills and treatment outcomes in cognitive-behavioral group therapy for alcoholism

14 Aug
Coping skills and treatment outcomes in cognitive-behavioral and interactional group therapy for alcoholism.
Researchers from the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington randomly assigned 128 alcohol dependent men and women receiving 26 weeks of group treatment into one of two modalities: Cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) intended specifically to develop coping skills or interactional therapy intended to examine interpersonal relationships.

Coping skills and drinking were assessed prior to and after treatment and up to 18 months after intake. Results indicated that both treatments yielded very good drinking outcomes throughout the follow-up period. Increased coping skills was a significant predictor of outcome. However, neither treatment effected greater increases in coping than the other. Specific coping-skills training was not essential for increasing the use of coping skills.

Citation: Litt MD, Kadden RM, Cooney NL, Kabela E. Coping skills and treatment outcomes in cognitive-behavioral and interactional group therapy for alcoholism. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 2003 Feb; 71 (1): pp 118-28.

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award