Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys

You are here: Home Hot Research Effect of a cognitive behavioral intervention on reducing symptom severity during chemotherapy

enews signup

Email

Effect of a cognitive behavioral intervention on reducing symptom severity during chemotherapy

22 Mar
Researchers from Michigan State University reported on their randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral intervention on reducing symptom severity for patients diagnosed with solid tumors and undergoing a first course of chemotherapy. Investigators also looked into whether or not the intervention had an additive or interactive effect on symptom severity, alongside the use of supportive medications.

Patients (n = 237) were accrued from comprehensive and community cancer centers, interviewed, and randomly assigned to either the experimental intervention (n = 118) or conventional care (n = 119). A symptom severity index, based on summed severity scores across 15 symptoms, was the primary measure of outcome. In addition, information was collected from medical records about each patient''s cancer site, the stage at diagnosis, history of chemotherapy protocols, and use of supportive medications.
The two groups were equivalent at baseline, and attrition by characteristics by group was equivalent as well. At the 10- and 20-week observation points, there was a significant interaction between the experimental group and baseline symptom severity. Patients in the experimental group who entered the trial with higher symptom severity reported significantly lower severity at 10 and 20 weeks. Controlling for chemotherapy treatment status at follow-up and supportive care medications did not alter the beneficial effect of the experimental intervention. The study concludes that, compared with conventional care alone, the experimental intervention was effective for patients who entered the trial with higher levels of symptom severity. Age, sex, site or stage of cancer, and supportive medications did not modify the effect of this cognitive behavioral intervention on symptom severity.

Citation: Given C, Given B, Rahbar M, Jeon S, McCorkle R, Cimprich B, Galecki A, Kozachik S, Brady A, Fisher-Malloy MJ, Courtney K, Bowie E.Effect of a cognitive behavioral intervention on reducing symptom severity during chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol. 2004 Feb 1;22(3):507-16. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award