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woman improvises her own imagery to help her relax and enjoy the MRI

27 Jun
During an MRI to detect any possible remaining breast cancer cells, a woman improvises her own imagery to help her relax and enjoy the procedure, in spite of what she calls "a smidge of claustrophobia"...
Hi, Belleruth. I had an MRI recently and wanted to share my experience because I actually found it enjoyable and thought it might help/interest someone else.

I''ve always had a smidge of claustrophobia, but decided to practice mindfulness meditation during the MRI. I tried to observe (non-judgmentally) the sounds & sensations as they came, and found that the MRI sounds started sounding like music (mind you, very avant garde music...).

The purpose of the MRI was to try to determine whether there were any bits of breast cancer remaining, post-lumpectomy. I tried to think of the MRI as a helper, and suddenly imagined any (hoping there were only 1-2) cells jumping up and down, waving their arms to try to attract a search light; then when the contrast dye was administered (I kind of hate that stuff too), I imagined the little cell floating on a raft in an ocean of dye, still yelling & waving trying to attract the search light.

I was so comfortable (no anxiety meds) that I was a little sad to have the MRI end!

Theresa-Anne
Belleruth Naparstek

Psychotherapist, author and guided imagery pioneer Belleruth Naparstek is the creator of the popular Health Journeys guided imagery audio series. Her latest book on imagery and posttraumatic stress, Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal (Bantam Dell), won the Spirituality & Health Top 50 Books Award