Guided Imagery and Meditation Blog | Health Journeys

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01 Mar

A chemo patient likes the affirmations on the guided imagery program she listens to during her infusions, but wonders what is meant by the statement, "I know I can heal myself and live or I can heal myself and die: my physical condition is not an indication of my wholeness", and BR explains what she meant by it.

Question:

I have finally found the perfect affirmations for me, just one thing I am confused about In your Chemo disc, you say you can heal yourself and live or heal yourself and die......would you kindly explain what you mean by 'heal yourself and die'?

23 Feb

We got this query from the friend of a woman about to begin months of intensive chemotherapy. The friend who wrote felt she had benefited greatly from guided imagery during her own bout with cancer, so she wanted her friend to have the same experience. But her friend has severe hearing loss. She wondered how an audio intervention could possibly work.

Question:

First of all, thank you. When I went through chemotherapy, your meditation CDs were a lifesaver (or at least a sleep-saver). My oncology rehab program used them at the end of our exercise sessions, and after a few weeks, my brain was trained to get sleepy when I started the recording.

Now I have a friend about to enter intensive, months' long treatment, and I'd like her to have the same benefit. However, she has severe hearing loss, only hearing with the help of an implant -- and as a result, I suspect that something that is mostly auditory would not be relaxing for her.

01 Jan

We got this inspiring note from a creative massage therapist who put together a potent combo of healing ingredients. Read on!

Dear Health Journeys,

I want to thank you for all the fantastic material you offer. I am an LMT (Licensed Massage Therapist), working at a large rehab facility.

Recently, I launched a program called "Meditative Massage", in which clients receive a gentle, slow flowing aromatherapy massage while listening to the guided imagery topic of their choice.

14 Jul

Hello! I am a student physical therapist and am working at one of my clinical rotations right now. I have noticed several patients could benefit from guided imagery to help them relax. Do you have any short sessions, between 10-15 minutes? Patients will often have a hot or cold pack, etc for 10-15 minutes and I would love to try a guided imagery session at the same time, since we shut the lights off anyways to help promote relaxation. Thank you for your time.

Karl

12 Jun

We love getting birth announcements. Some come from people who had fertility struggles, maybe a series of miscarriages; sometimes we hear from people who had difficult pregnancies; and sometimes, like the message below, we just hear about a regular birth experience made a little easier.

We are still hoping for a systematized study of guided imagery in childbirth, but until one of those comes down the pike, we'll settle gratefully for postings like this one:

I gifted my 28 yr old daughter with the Pregnancy & Childbirth Pack early in her pregnancy. She has used Belleruth's guided imagery in the past.

She just delivered last Saturday and was notably calm during the process - so much so, the nurses commented and asked her if she'd been practicing imagery and/ or meditation for a while.

The Pregnancy & Childbirth Pack was especially helpful to her during her pregnancy & delivery. I now have a 6 lb 1 oz grandson -- my first! :)

Thank you, Belleruth & all the staff at Health Journeys!
Maree K.

[Ed. Note: We just found a whole pile of happy CD users of this guided imagery here as well! ]

27 Nov

Researchers from the Beaumont Health System in Royal Oak MI evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy, with or without guided imagery, in reducing anxiety prior to cardiac catheterization.

A total of 55 inpatients and outpatients received massage, guided imagery, or massage with guided imagery prior to cardiac catheterization. Self-reported anxiety levels and blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated in participants and a matched comparison group.

Massage with and without guided imagery resulted in significant reductions in self-reported anxiety (p < 0.0001). Additionally, patients receiving the intervention had lower diastolic BP and HR vs. the comparison group (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.05).

21 Nov

I worked as an art therapist on a dialysis unit in Cleveland, Ohio for five years. A music therapist (who made individualized tapes for each patient) joined me, and together we were successful in uplifting the mood and environment of the unit, both for the patients and the staff.

We were certain we prevented blood pressures from dropping when people worked with us, and attempted a study to prove this. Unfortunately, statistics got in the way and we were never able to finish the study.

Nevertheless, we remain steadfast in our belief that art and music therapies benefit and improve the dialysis experience.

Sara Dickman, M.S., ATR with Marianne Kallen.

24 Oct

This email came to us from a physician who suffered a painful, ruptured cervical disk. He had serious reservations about opting for back surgery if he could use other, less invasive methods, and guided imagery helped him with the pain enough to allow him to hold out and use yoga and chiropractic to get the job done. Check it out:

Dear Health Journeys,

I have experienced first hand how effective guided imagery can be. I am a long- time distributor and have always believed in the efficacy of imagery, but experiencing its benefits personally takes my enthusiasm to a whole, new level.

I used the Ease Pain imagery during a very rough time with a ruptured cervical disk, which is now fully under control, thanks in large part to Chiropractic and Yoga.

09 Oct

Researchers from the Continuum Cancer Centers of New York, Beth Israel Medical Center, evaluated the impact of guided imagery on patients undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer.

Eligible patients receiving guided imagery sessions were monitored via biofeedback before and after each session.  Monitored measures included blood pressure, respiration rate, pulse rate, and skin temperature.

In addition, a quality of life questionnaire (the EuroQoL Group's EQ-5D) was used for subjective assessment, and patient feedback was collected at the end of radiation therapy through a satisfaction survey.

26 Sep

Dear Health Journeys,

I am manager of technical operations at a dialysis center, and we recently introduced guided imagery to support our patients. They typically sit for hours in reclining chairs several times a week while undergoing treatment.  Most turn on the TV and drift off to sleep during their treatment.  Some of them close their eyes and appear to sleep.  Most become “out of it” during this process.

This was not the case with the patients who listened to the guided imagery. They really fell asleep, soundly!  They knew it was O.K. to fall asleep and still benefit from the CD as instructed.  After their treatment, they were still relaxed, yet seemed refreshed from a "deep" sleep.  We were excited to see this, as this is not the usual.

One patient who has a fear of needles listened to the imagery prior to her treatment.   I asked how she felt, after starting her treatment, and she stated the CD relaxed her enough make it easier to hook up to treatment.  This was another encouraging outcome.