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Posttraumatic Stress (PTSD)

Posttraumatic Stress (PTSD) (276)

10 Jul

Someone who suffered a traumatic injury, with many broken bones, lots of pain and multiple surgeries, gives a testimonial to the power of guided imagery for help with sleep, pain and despair.

It should also be noted that some of the very earliest studies with guided imagery – back in the 70's and 80's, with Jean Achtenberg and Frank Lawlis, demonstrated that it could in fact speed up the healing of broken bone tissue.

Here is the note:

I have had the healing from trauma CD for years and listen to it almost daily; it has helped me through a very trying time involving a very bad fall which broke several bones as well as aggravation of old back surgery, necessitating another surgery soon. If not for imagery, I would never be able to take as little as a third of the pain Rx's, or sleep well without pills. I know that I'll be able to get through the rest of this experience with this imagery. It marshals my inner strength and gives me patience. And hope. Thank you, thank you.

Vera

23 Jun

I'm very new to guided imagery. After listening to Healing Trauma for a couple of weeks, I find that my mind now "goes off" somewhere (sort of like right before falling asleep, but not sleeping).

I am aware that thoughts are flitting in and out but I can't remember what I was "thinking" about or otherwise doing. And I have no memory of anything said on the CD. This usually lasts for most of the entire CD.

I feel relaxed when I "awake" but am wondering if, because I don't remember hearing anything on the CD past the first few minutes, if I am missing the whole point or IS that the whole point? This doesn't happen when I just listen to the affirmations. Thank you for your answer.

Christy

12 May

Belleruth,

My husband died from lung cancer in 2011 and not three months later I myself was diagnosed with colon cancer.

I have many of your CD's (I don't know if I could have gotten through treatment without them, by the way) and listen to one or another of them at bedtime, every night.
Something I really wish you would address in a future CD is something to help with the fear of recurrence. Things always seem so much worse at night, when you are alone in the dark. That fear is not the same thing as anxiety. Please consider this.

Best,
Denise

07 Apr

Hi.

I watched Belleruth today being interviewed on London TV. I was amazed. I was abused as a child, from 18 months to 22 years old. During my twenties, whenever a memory or flashback invaded my head, I used to visualize myself as an adult, rescuing me as a child. This had a profound effect on me, and also shifted the dynamics of powerlessness. Although I could not change what happened to me, I did not have to relive the horror in memories or flashbacks. In time, the flashbacks faded away and did not bother me. I am at peace with my childhood.

However, 3 years ago, I was date raped, and I am having difficulties. The memories are not there, although the feelings of terror are. I suffer terrible panic attacks, and I jump from anger and pain to apathy and not leaving the house. How do I get past memories I don't have? Please help.

Kind regards, Carina

17 Mar

Question:

Belleruth,

I tried using the guided meditation in the Healing Trauma CD and had a very uncomfortable, scary, physical experience, so I shut it off. My body went into a shut down mode when it heard the music, which was staccato-y and unlike the music I was used to hearing on some of your other CDs I've heard before, which were very relaxing.

You said early on this CD that everything on it had a purpose, so I figured there was a particular reason why you had this background music. Have you heard of this reaction before from others?
Is it set up to possibly evoke some underlying response or shift if needed for the individual? Does this mean I should not use this particular CD or go through the experience it is evoking if I feel up to it?

24 Feb

Dear Belleruth,

I am a therapist working with a woman who is afraid to close her eyes. The very idea creates extreme anxiety, and therefore I cannot use meditation or guided imagery with her, even though both of us believe it could be very beneficial for her. Obviously this has to do with her traumatized past, involving childhood sexual abuse. Any suggestions?

Dr. Jim

17 Feb

We got this thought-provoking question from somebody who'd been browsing our catalog, and objected to the way we had put our guided imagery for heartbreak, abandonment and betrayal under the category for posttraumatic stress...

Hello -- love your work! Thank you.

One small quibble. I see that in the catalog your "heartbreak" material is listed under "PTSD".

I worked the recovery effort at the World Trade Center (well -- I made coffee for the guys who worked in hell and hugged them when they left hell to come to me on hell's fringes) and know a lot of people who have truly seen the worst of the worst. Some of them - unsurprisingly - have PTSD.

29 Jan

Researchers from Syracuse University looked at how to reduce the adrenergized alarm state experienced by veterans with PTSD, a hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction that is reflected in measurable cortisol output.

Knowing that many veterans with PTSD are hesitant to engage in distressing, triggering trauma-focused exposure treatments, these investigators explored the impact that non-exposure-based treatments, briefer in duration might have.

One such promising approach is an abbreviated, Primary Care, 4-week, brief Mindfulness Program (PCbMP).

20 Jan

Dear Belleruth,

My wife has had OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) since at least 1963, along with deep depression. Though she will be in a program at UCLA and is under doctor's care, and I don't expect immediate "cures," is there anything else that might be helpful for her? And, honestly, I'm not all that hopeful about holistic medicine, but I feel we have to try all avenues.

Thank you.
Jose M.

Dear Jose,

I'm guessing that some segments of the program your wife will be participating in at UCLA will provide selected mind-body training in relaxation, along with medication (probably from the class of drugs called SSRI's, such as Zoloft, Prozac, etc), cognitive-behavioral techniques, psycho-education and possibly group support – all of which can be extremely helpful over time.

You are wise to gear yourself not to expect a "silver bullet" that yields an instant cure – lasting positive changes tend to be incremental over time, not quick fixes. But if she sticks with the program, I think it's fair to say you both will see results.

08 Jan

Researchers from Stanford University, the University of New Mexico and New York University conducted a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate 6-month outcomes from a skills-based intervention designed to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression in mothers of preterm infants.

One hundred five mothers of preterm infants were randomly assigned to (1) a 6- or 9-session intervention based on principles of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy with infant redefinition or (2) a 1-session active comparison intervention based on education about the NICU and parenting of the premature infant.

Outcome measures included the Davidson Trauma Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory II, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Participants were assessed at baseline, 4 to 5 weeks after birth, and 6 months after the birth of the premature infant.