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Posttraumatic Stress (PTSD)

Posttraumatic Stress (PTSD) (276)

21 Oct

Question:

I'm a psychologist specializing in PTSD. A client's husband has just received orders to go to Liberia to work on the Ebola crisis. Do you know of or could you develop any imagery that could help prevent PTSD in such health workers who will likely witness scenes of horror that may haunt them in the future? Thanks! It's okay to post this.

10 Oct

This was posted on a Christian CD thread from a survivor of childhood abuse. We're putting it here because of the way the writer speaks to a very unique and potent characteristic of guided imagery (hypnosis, too) – the way it functions like a depth charge, dropped below the surface of conscious thinking (and under the pesky radar of resistance and ambivalence) where it can reverberate again and again, catalyzing a deep and system-wide kind of healing that may go unnoticed for some time.

23 Sep

We got this great question from K. after she read about all the state National Guards using guided imagery for returning service members. She asks about using guided imagery preventively. Here is her question:  

Just read your article re various state National Guards ordering your CD's for their national guardsmen and women returning from service. I have a National Guard friend who is preparing to ship out in December.

Would listening to the CD's you mentioned help to prevent build up of stress while serving? Or would you suggest other CD titles to help processing of stressful events as they occur?

11 Sep

This study may be an indirect chide to the research community for continuing to lean toward studies on the effectiveness of exposure therapy and CBT for PTS when EMDR (eye movement desensitization & reprocessing) may perform even better.
 
In a review and meta-analysis out of Sao Paolo, Brazil, investigators compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to cognitive therapy (CT) and exposure therapy (ET) for the treatment of posttraumatic stress (PTSD).

Studies were gathered from the Cochrane, Embase and Medline databases. Studies were required to be randomized controlled trials (RCT’s), published between 2006 and 2012, comparing CBT, CT, or ET with (1) each other, (2) other active treatments (e.g., EMDR, counseling, supportive therapy), or (3) assessment-only or wait list conditions. The main outcome measures were diagnostic changes and symptomatic remission.

The final sample contained 29 articles.  CBT, CT, and ET were each shown to be efficacious treatments when compared to wait list/no treatment conditions, and no differences were found between these methods.

30 Mar

Hello. I am a trauma survivor, the kind that is the most seasoned from early life abuse and patterns of self-destructive behavior. Although the acting out ended decades ago, I am truly impressed at how much work it is to heal from this kind of trauma which is related to my sexuality.

I'm writing mainly to say a deep, heartfelt THANK YOU to Belleruth for helping me find genuine relief and therapy through her book and guided imagery for trauma survivors.

I say ‘better late than never’ as it took this long to find what soothes and heals the wounds. I have also found refuge in Sudarshan Kriya Yoga, which is used for war veterans to regulate their breathing and hormone levels related to PTSD.

24 Mar

Researchers from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor investigated the feasibility, appeal, and clinical efficacy of an MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) group intervention, adapted for combat-related posttraumatic stress, or PTSD, as the VA still calls it.
   
Consecutive patients seeking treatment for chronic PTSD at a VA outpatient clinic were enrolled in 8-week MBCT groups, modified for posttraumatic stress (four groups, n = 20) or brief treatment-as-usual (TAU) comparison group interventions (three groups, n = 17).
 
Pre- and post-therapy psychological assessments used the CAPS scale (clinician administered PTSD scale) on all patients.  In addition, the MBCT groups filled out , self-report measures (the PTSD diagnostic scale, PDS, and the posttraumatic cognitions inventory, PTCI).

17 Mar

Question:

Hello -- love your work. Thank you.

One small quibble: I see that in the catalog your "heartbreak" material got listed under Posttraumatic Stress.

I worked the recovery effort at the World Trade Center (well -- I made coffee for the guys who worked in hell and hugged them when they left hell to come to me on hell's fringes) and know a lot of people who have truly seen the worst of the worst. Some of them - unsurprisingly - have PTSD.

It can be tough to get them to deal with it in some cases, and they can be rightfully touchy. One of "my" guys - who truly went through hell thousands of times: he's the bravest man I know - called me in a fury recently.  He'd read an article about a woman claiming she had PTSD because someone pinched her. He felt (and I agreed) that that cheapened his experience (and it's very hard for PTSD sufferers to be taken seriously, as you know).

I'd move the "Heartbreak" material out of the PTSD section for the same reason. Heartbreak is awful -- I've been there. But PTSD is different and worse.

Please consider reorganizing that listing. "My" boys would appreciate it.

Thanks,
Karen

03 Mar

Question:

Hi Belleruth,
I would like to get a tape for a friend who has had a series of health issues after having a cardiac event, which in the end turned out to be nothing serious, although she was quite scared.

She was healthy and vibrant before the event. Now it seems like there are non-stop health issues (digestive issues, odd pains, hypervigilance, fear everything is cancer, etc.), some of which are likely psychosomatic in nature.

What tape would you suggest for her to recover her past health and well being?

Thank you!
Mark

24 Feb

Hi,

I’m an LPC and LMFT and attended one of your workshops (Houston, 2004 maybe). I refer a lot of clients to your website to purchase CDs and love your work.

I have a new client who is on Lexapro, Resperdil, and Xanax for the most severe anxiety Ive seen in my 42 years counseling.
 
Jan. 2013 he suffered a spinal cord injury in a ski accident/long rehab/finally back to work as an attorney and walking w/crutches. Doing well.

Then several months later, he falls apart w/anxiety, physical pain in legs and legs shaking constantly/spastic - finally quits going to work and is now in a wheelchair.
 
Had another brain and spinal cord MRI and doctors find nothing wrong. Just sits & does NOTHING. No hope. Becoming irritated by everything.

I had them buy your Ease Pain CD and Healthful Sleep (as hes getting only a few hours of sleep). He listened to Ease Pain only a few times and says it irritates him and he refuses to listen.

Any suggestions?

Thank you.

17 Feb

Listen to an audio sample
of Healing Trauma

BR got this wonderful note from a hard working EMT who was suffering from all the times he couldn’t save someone –the images of kids especially stayed in his mind and kept him awake at night.  Check it out:  

Dear Belleruth,

I figured out recently that I have PTSD.  I am an EMT who has seen a lot of hard situations.  

The scenes that stayed with me, kept me awake at night, were the ones where I tried but couldn’t help, in spite of my best efforts.  Especially the failures with kids got to me. It was years of building up.

My social worker girlfriend hooked me up with the HJ site.  The reviews of the Trauma imagery got my attention.  I ordered the download and to my surprise, it helped me immediately. I listened to it every night for about a week. It never failed to bring tears to my eyes, but they were good tears and I was okay with that.

These days I listen to it every now and then.  It is my booster shot.

I sleep well now.  I stopped faulting myself for the failures. I do the best I can and I know I am good at my job.  I feel strong and appreciative of what I try to do. I know I make a difference when I can.

I want to encourage others to use it.  It’s the best thing I’ve done for myself when it comes to emotional trauma from the work I do.

Andrew P.